Groza Learning Center

College Class of 2025

Class of 2025

Did you know that this year’s applicant pool for the College Class of 2025 has been the most competitive in recent history.  With limited access to traditional extracurriculars such as sports and school clubs, prospective college students wondered – what will colleges expect from them?  College Admission

This year was all about student’s personal stories.  In addition to grades, colleges required compelling essays and videos that documented students’ growth, limitations, and lessons learned during COVID-19.

Strong writing and communication skills were a must for this year’s applicants.

Less academic pressure and commitments make summer a perfect time to brush up on essay writing and interview skills and give you an edge over the competition! 

CLASS OF 2025 – ACCEPTANCE RATES

  • Brown University: 5.4%
  • Columbia University: 4%
  • Dartmouth College: 6.17%
  • Harvard University: 3.4%
  • Princeton University: 4%
  • University of Pennsylvania: 5.68%
  • Yale University: 4.62%
  • MIT: 4%
  • Duke University: 5.76%
  • Johns Hopkins University: 6%
  • Vanderbilt University: 6.7%
  • Amherst College: 8%
  • Colby College:8%
  • Swarthmore College: 8%
  • Williams College: 8%
  • Rice University: 9.3 %
  • Barnard College: 10.4%
  • Tufts University: 11%
  • University of Southern California: 12%
  • Georgetown University: 12%
  • Boston College: 18.9%
  • NYU: 12.8%
  • Washington University: 13%
  • Colorado College: 14%
  • University of Notre Dame: 15%
  • Middlebury College: 15.7%
  • Wellesley College: 16%
  • Colgate University: 17%
  • UVA: 20.6% (17% out of state)
  • Georgia Tech: 18%
  • Boston University: 18.3%
  • Emory University: 20%
  • Bucknell University: 34%
  • Villanova University: 25%

 

Dear Class of 2025,

The Groza Team would like to extend a heartfelt congratulations to the Class of 2025!  Your exceptional work, dedication, and grit during this very unusual time has paid off.  This year’s pandemic-fueled surge in applications translated into record-low acceptance rates for the country’s colleges.  In fact, this year’s applicant pool for the college Class of 2025 has been the most competitive in recent history.

The coronavirus pandemic has made in-person standardized testing difficult (if not impossible).  Therefore, most Colleges across the country made standardized tests optional — including all eight Ivy League schools and the entire University of California system.

We are very proud of you and we wish you continued success on your exciting journey!

Warmly,
The Groza Learning Center Team

How to be Productive Over Winter Break

winter break tutoring - 2

Sure, I will get some work done during winter break . . .eventually.

It knows when you are sleeping

It knows when you’re awake

It knows when you are bad or good

So be good for goodness sake

You better watch out

You better not cry

You better not pout

I’m telling you why

Procrastination is coming to town!

 

 

Case in point…I REALLY did not want to sit down and write this article for December. Winter break is a time to sit back, relax, recharge, and recoup. It is certainly tempting for students (primarily middle and high school students) to spend their days mindlessly scrolling through social media, watching TV, or playing video games. After all, they have three weeks, and there will be plenty of time to get to any schoolwork that may need attention. Sure, they will get some work done . . .eventually. But suddenly, it’s the last day of break, and they are stressed out for the upcoming semester because they got nothing accomplished.  

 

As parents and teachers, we know this year has been extremely challenging for students; many have fallen behind due to online learning.

Winter Break is the perfect opportunity to get students caught up so that they can begin their journey into 2021 with confidence, in-fact, winter break is an even better time than the regular school year to seek private tutoring.  For starters, tutoring over the winter break gives students the ability to catch up or get ahead in a stress-free manner.

 

Winter Break Tutoring

 

CALL A TUTOR!

 

 

An experienced tutor will help your child:

  • Review the semester and identify weaknesses.
  • Check-In with teachers; often, teachers will allow students to hand work in late.
  • Fill in the gaps.
  • Strengthen study skills.
  • Teach organizational techniques.
  • Prep for ACT, SAT, ISEE.
  • Boost confidence.
  • Reduce homework battles.
  • Write college essays.
  • Maintain structure and accountability.
  • Get ahead for next semester.
  • Support your child during their Zoom classes.

 

Groza Instructors are experience, and many, are credentialed teachers who will go above and beyond to ensure your child’s success.

When it comes to tutoring and academic advancement, Groza goes far beyond simply finding the correct answer. We seek to enhance, and even entirely reshape how a student thinks about each subject. We work with families to identify learning objectives and hit their goals.

Because every student learns differently, we carefully monitor and optimize their unique learning plan as they advance, giving special attention to their unique learning style, how to effectively engage and inspire the student, and what the individual progress suggests moving forward.

Your child is unique. So, don’t settle for a one size fits all approach.
Instead, give them a learning experience that meets their individual needs.

Groza Learning Center’s Winter Break tutoring programs

 

Tips on How to Reduce Homework Distractions

Tips on How to Reduce Homework Distractions

In a time of digital media, a world of distractions is at your fingertips so, minimizing as many distractions as possible will help get homework off your to-do list quicker and more efficiently.   Here are a few tricks to help get you started.

Cultivating the Perfect Environment:

In order to save memory for more important tasks your brain builds associations between objects and actions.  For example, the dining room is associated with eating, the kitchen with cooking, and the bedroom with sleeping. These associations are especially useful when trying to build an environment that primes your brain for homework.  If you can designate a room in your house for homework, then you are already on the right track however, if this is not the case there are other actions you can take.  Begin with finding a desk that you will use exclusively for schoolwork and not for any other activities such as, video games.  Building a homework environment is not limited to the actual location.

Other Environmental Factors to Consider:

• Do you focus better in a warmer or colder room?

• Do you prefer warmer (orange) light or colder (blue) light?

• Do you prefer perfect silence or listening to music?

• If you prefer to listen to music, can you concentrate with or without lyrics?

Once again, these are only examples and if you stumble upon other factors that make or break your environment feel free to adjust.

Material Clutter:

Being surrounded by clutter and mess is no fun in fact, it can be quite stressful.  Having papers scattered all over your desk before getting to work is just one more distraction from getting your homework done.  It should be a no-brainer, but it is worth a mention. Everyday after you finish your homework, make sure to clean your desk and revert it back to its original state. This ensures that the next day you will get to your homework much faster. Remove everything you don’t need for your current task from your desk and ensure you have all your papers, pens, pencils and, other materials at hand.  An organized environment will allow you to stay focused for longer.

If you are constantly getting up from your desk to get something, you will begin to forget where you left off, and eventually you will have to rethink through all the homework.  Lastly, creating a filing system at home can be very useful; filing older assignments away will ensure less clutter while working and easier referencing to previous material when studying.

Mental Clutter:

Physical clutter is distracting, but the effects of mental clutter can be even worse.  Have you ever just thought about all the tests and projects in the upcoming week and felt completely stress out?  We have all been there and experienced that overwhelming feeling of not knowing where to start. It is something every student goes through, but it can be avoided. Using simple organizers such as a planner, to-do list, or a calendar are all strategies for decluttering your mind. By writing things down you ease the stress level by allowing your brain to forget about it and use the energy towards something else. Want to go the extra mile and further reduce stress?  Block out the time it will take to complete each task so that you can better plan your days and weeks.

Digital Distractions:

The greatest source of distraction for students at this time is digital media. It is the phone in your pocket, the TV in the living room, and video games on your desk.  The first tip for minimizing digital distractions is, if you do not need it, put it away.  Instead of using your iPhone for math use a calculator. If you are struggling to stay focused because of your devices consider using apps such as Freedom and Anti-Social, both provide features that will limit your internet access to keep you on track with your assignments.

If you trust yourself enough, the Pomodoro Technique might be the way to go. This technique regimes your homework time into intervals of 25 minutes of intense work, then five minutes of break. After 4 repetitions of this (one hour and 40 minutes of laser focus work,) you can take a break for a longer interval such as 30 minutes. If you can hold yourself to this standard without falling into routine checks of your social media account, then your homework will be done in no time. Lastly, with most assignments being completed and submitted online it is crucial to keep organized files on your computer. Whether you use, OneDrive, Google Drive or Dropbox, accurately labelling and filing your work will make it easy to navigate, and  less likely that you will be frantically scrolling through folders trying to find that one paper minutes before submission.

Academic Management:

If your student is struggling to stay organized and is falling behind due to poor academic management there is help available.  A tutor or learning center can set them up for success by empowering them with specific organizational tools and tactics.  Academic management programs will teach students how to stay on task by developing new ways of thinking, habits, and routines that directly impact schoolwork and day-to-day living.

For more information about Groza’s Academic Management program:
Call: (310)454-3731
Email: [email protected]

How are the Top 20 Nationwide Universities Responding to COVID-19?

Test Optional Universities

Universities

 

Recently, the College Board announced that they will not be administering at home SAT exams for the 2020-2021 school year. In addition, due to COVID-19 the capacity for in person examinations has been extremely limited.  These factors will prevent thousands of students from taking the SAT exam. Furthermore, the at home ACT testing option will not be available until late fall or early winter.

In light of this, FairTest.org is reporting that nearly half of all four year universities in the US, including the top 20, have gone test optional for the 2020-2021 admissions cycle. Of these top 20 universities, some have stated that they will be test optional for only the 2020-2021 admissions cycle, while others, such as California Institute of Technology, have stated that they will be test optional for a two year period.  Although students are not required to submit SAT or ACT scores, many schools, including Columbia University, strongly suggest submitting them as it can be a valuable addition to a student’s application.

Test Optional vs. Test Flexible vs. Test Blind:

Even with universities going test optional, there are still three categories in which a school can fall under. The first is a test optional college, where students decide on whether or not they want to submit test scores with their application.  The majority of test optional colleges will consider SAT or ACT scores, but will focus on a student’s essays, GPA, and recommendations. The second type is a test flexible college, which allows students to submit other standardized tests in place of the SAT or ACT.  For example, Advanced Placement tests and SAT Subject Tests. Lastly, the third category is a test blind college. These colleges will not consider test scores, even if students submit them.

Test-optional schools:

– Brown University

– Columbia University

– Cornell University

– Dartmouth University

– Duke University

– Harvard University

– John Hopkins University

– Massachusetts Institute of Technology

– Northwestern University

– Princeton University

– Rice University

– Stanford University

– University of California Los Angeles

– University of Chicago

– University of Notre Dame

– University of Pennsylvania

– Vanderbilt University

– Washington University in St. Louis

– Yale University

Test-Blind Schools:

– California Institute of Technology

In place of the SAT or ACT, college admissions will be based on:

– Ability to handle challenging courses throughout high school;

– Commitment and effort in pursuing other challenging learning experiences;

– Community involvement;

– Extracurriculars (clubs, sports, activities outside of school);

– Letter of Recommendation from a teacher in a specific field (for example, a math teacher for students interested in STEM);

– Other standardized tests (AP, SAT Subject, state exams)

In conclusion, many universities have acknowledged that students who find themselves limited in the activities they can pursue due to COVID-19 will not be disadvantaged in the application process.

For more information about the College Admissions Process and SAT or ACT Test Prep
Call: (310) 454-3731
Groza Learning Center

A message from Chancellor Johnson on changes to Athletics

A message from Chancellor Johnson on changes to Athletics

Chancellor Johnson provides an important update on changes within the Department of Athletics & Recreation

Dear UMassD community,

I am writing to announce important changes to our Department of Athletics & Recreation.

The decision came after multiple reviews of the intercollegiate athletics program over the past decade. To provide our student-athletes with an exceptional experience, these reviews focused on the areas of sports sponsorship, as well as all areas of department organization. The reviews analyzed major aspects of the department, including available resources, gender equity, enrollment, full-time/part-time coaches, sports sponsorship trends, facilities, as well as strengths and weaknesses of programs.

Intercollegiate athletics provide valuable leadership opportunities for our students and contribute significantly to the vibrancy of our campus. However, our current composition is not sustainable moving forward. With 25 intercollegiate athletic programs, UMass Dartmouth has the second-highest number of offerings in the Little East Conference and this has hindered our ability to effectively support all our student-athletes and teams. The average number of sports offered by NCAA Division III institutions is 19.

Considering this reality, it is with a heavy heart that I must announce that UMass Dartmouth will discontinue eight intercollegiate athletic programs. Effective immediately, the University will no longer sponsor women’s equestrian, men’s golf, men’s lacrosse, co-ed sailing, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, and men’s and women’s tennis.

Although these changes will serve UMass Dartmouth Athletics and its student body well for years to come, I cannot begin to imagine the sense of loss our student-athletes must feel at this moment. I want them to know that this decision in no way reflects their tremendous contribution to our University. It is because of these contributions – not just on the field – but in the classrooms, labs, and in the community that makes our student-athletes such valuable members of our community. It should be noted this process began before COVID-19 and is in no way related to the current health crisis.

Our top priority this summer will be to provide support and advising to affected students. Announcing these changes now provides our current and newly recruited student-athletes’ much-needed flexibility to consider their options.

Our incoming and current student-athletes will have the opportunity to join live Zoom sessions with Athletics staff, colleagues in Student Affairs, and other support staff to ask questions and learn more about this decision. Human Resources is also committed to supporting our coaches during this difficult time. Please review our Frequently Asked Questions website for additional information.

UMass Dartmouth is committed to the remaining Athletics program and will be maintaining its current operational budget. The savings realized because of these changes will be allocated strategically within the Department and reinvested in the remaining athletic programs. Our expectation is this will lead to a more sustainable future.

This decision was not made lightly, and I understand the impact it will have for students and their families, for alumni of our teams and our coaches. The University will continue to support our Athletics Department in every way possible as we navigate this transition together.

With gratitude,

Robert E. Johnson, Ph.D.

Chancellor